Read @drjodigold 's book, screen-smart parenting for wise, constructive advice on kids and tech usage

Jodi Gold spoke at my school's Parents Association meeting on finding balance in children’s use of technology (in its various forms). She was entertaining, informative, and most of all, constructive.

I have not read her book (screen-smart parenting) yet (though I purchased it on the spot), but if it is half as useful as her talk, it is a must read.

She gave us practical advice upon practical advice: everything from how to talk to your kids about selfies to creating family guidelines and behavior plans that work, and much more.

The key take away for me was that working on kids’ healthy relationship with technology should begin in nursery school.

Some other tips from her included:

  • have your tween/teen install the self control app
  • don’t spy on your kids, get in the practice of them touring you through their tech world, and giving you their passwords
  • use technology to send people compliments and caring expressions
  • delete embarrassing photos
  • don’t like mean posts
  • unsubscribe from mean group chats
  • do talk about pornography with your kids
  • too many more to list!

Photomath app is blowing my mind via @KarenBlumberg


This app, without overstating it, is a game changer to me. It is a game changer because students will inevitably use it. The challenge for teachers becomes that knowing that, how will we assign work accordingly?

The best assignment I could imagine would be for students to design their own app with the same functionality, the ability to solve problems. What would a computer need to be told to do to be an effective problem solver?

I am not sure why, but I am really stunned by the capabilities of this seemingly simple app.

Hi friends and strangers, please interact with me, not your mobile device

Phone addiction has spread far and wide. I see it amongst my friends, my family, my colleagues, my students, strangers. Really, everywhere. Not everyone, yet, but I'm getting worried. I am an educational technologist. I love technology. I am writing on my laptop while listening to Spotify remote streaming to my TV. But, things go awry when it interrupts our ability to love and interact with each other.

I feel like maybe we're on a pendulum ride that has swung way over to one side, and we'll swing back a bit. I hope so, because I'm not loving blind compulsion to "interact" with our devices. We should control devices, and not the other way around.

This video spoke to me so clearly in exhibiting this phenomenon. I hope you take 2 minutes and 11 seconds of dedicated (no multitasking) to watch it. It's sad in some ways, but so spot on.